SOCIETY

Just as military service members observe, slapping your coin down on a table means you are challenging those around you to produce their coins on the spot. Any who do not, owe the rest a round of drinks. If everyone does produce a coin, then the original challenger buys the round.

MEMBERS

Jonny Hume Bonbar Newcastle
Chris Tanner Milk and Honey London
Mark Delaney Filter and Fox Liverpool
Jonas Stern Pollen Street Social London
Kyle Hamilton Panda and Sons Edinburgh
Isaac Windsor Milk Thistle Bristol
Ehren Khoo-Steel Brass Monkey Nottingham

COIN CHALLENGE RULES

  1. Rules of the coin game must be given or explained to all new coin holders.
  2. The coin MUST be carried at all times. You can be challenged for it anywhere, at any time. You must produce the coin without taking more than 4 steps to produce it.
  3. When challenging, the challenger must state whether it is for a single drink or a round of drinks.
  4. Failure to produce a coin, for whatever reason, results in a bought round or single drinks (whatever the challenger stated). This type of transaction could be expensive, so hold onto your coin. Once the offender (coinless challengee) has bought the drink or round, they can’t be challenged again.
  5. If all that are challenged produce their coins, the challenger loses and must buy the drinks for all respondents. This too can be expensive, so challenge wisely.
  6. Under no circumstances can a coin be handed to another in response to a challenge. If a person gives their coin to another, that person can now keep the coin — it’s theirs!!! However, if a person places the coin down and another person picks it up to examine it, that is not considered giving and the examiner is honor-bound to place the coin back where they got it. The examiner can’t challenge while they hold another’s coin. After negotiating a “reasonable” ransom”, the examiner must return the member’s coin.
  7. If a coin is lost, replacement is up to the individual. A new coin should be acquired at the earliest opportunity — losing a coin and not replacing it doesn’t relieve a member of his or her responsibilities. This is especially true if your fellow CPO’s know that you traditionally carry a coin.
  8. The coin should be controlled at all times. Giving a coin to just anyone is like opening a fraternity to just anyone. It is an honor to be given a coin, let’s keep it that way. A given or awarded coin is of more personal value than a purchased coin.
  9. No holes may be drilled in a coin.
  10. The above rules apply to anyone who is worthy to be given/awarded a coin, has a purchased coin, or who is known to be a previous coin holder.